Curried Coconut Cauliflower Lentils.

1 c dry lentils

4 c cold water

1 bay leaf

4 cloves garlic, smashed and minced

1 head cauliflower, cut into 1/2″ pieces

1-2 heaping tbsp curry powder

1 can coconut milk

Rice, cilantro, and soy sauce for serving (optional)

Olive oil

Sea salt

In a large saucepan with a lid, combine lentils, water, and bay leaf. Prop lid so that it releases some steam. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to simmer 20 minutes or until lentils are soft but still intact. Drain and remove from pan, reserving bay leaf. In the same saucepan, heat 2 tbsp oil over medium-high heat and saute garlic for 30 seconds, seasoning lightly with salt. Add cauliflower and more salt and cook until cauliflower starts to soften, about 3 minutes. Sprinkle 1 tbsp curry powder over cauliflower and garlic, stirring to generously coat each piece with curry powder. It should be dry. Stir for 1 minute, lightly toasting curry powder. Stir in lentils, reserved bay leaf, coconut milk, and a little more salt. Taste; adjust seasoning as necessary. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 5 minutes or until cauliflower is tender. Serve over rice topped with cilantro and soy sauce.

Tomato Cappelini Pasta with Zucchini and Beans.

The Italian way to name this dish is “pasta e fagioli,” but I am so far from Italian, tomatoes get offended. That said, I do get along with many bright, veggie-filled Italian summer dishes in spite of my thick GermIrish heritage. This recipe is totally boring in the best way. It has few ingredients and lots of potential for additions. It’s filling and full of fiber but! leaves room for dessert later which is a must for this fat kid over here. It’s August; you still have plenty of time to throw this together with fresh local varieties of the listed ingredients. Go on, now! Get to it!

1/4 c onion, thinly sliced

3 cloves garlic, smashed and minced

4 Roma tomatoes, chopped

2 medium zucchini, thinly sliced

4 oz angel hair pasta

3 c boiling water

1 can cannellini beans, rinsed

Fresh basil, optional

Olive oil

Salt and pepper

In a large skillet, saute onions over medium-high heat in 2 tbsp olive oil until softened, about 4 minutes. Season lightly with salt. Add garlic and a pinch of salt; stir for 30 seconds. Toss in zucchini with another pinch of salt and stir to evenly distribute garlic and onion with the zucchini. When zucchini begins to barely soften and release moisture, add tomatoes and more salt and reduce heat to medium. Allow to simmer 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove vegetables from pan and set them aside. In the same pan, pour in boiling water and 1/2 tsp salt. Add pasta and cook for 2 minutes or until noodles are fairly limp. Drain most of the water and add vegetables back into the pan; turn heat on high and allow pasta to finish cooking in the vegetable juices until it absorbs most of the liquid. Remove from heat and toss in beans. Top with basil, if desired.

Presto Vegan Lemon Basil Pesto.

All summer long, I’ve been growing a curious form of basil that has tiny leaves and chewy stems. It grows like a mofo, looks gorgeous, and the leaves are potently basil-y. My only issue is the stems. Usually basil is so tender and edible, but the stalks on which the itty-bitty delicate leaves grow are like chewing on twist-ties. Annoying. I assure you, I’ve been dealing with this monstrous inconvenience juuusssst fine and have been eating the shiznitty out of some basil, but I wish I wish I wish the stems were a little softer. It was partly out of leaf-plucking laziness and partly out of a desperate need for an adult condiment for baked potatoes that lead me to make this gem of a pesto. Ever notice how so many pesto recipes have cheese? I HATE that. I don’t want cheese in my pesto! Thankfully, I wasn’t missing flavor in this recipe. Lemon and basil basically make out and produce flavor babies and my mouth throws them a party. This shit goes on anything. We put it on potatoes, but then I got ornery and put it on my cole slaw just to see what happened (I ate it) (it was really good) (I recommend it). When I found myself licking the bowl it was in, I felt shame for a split second and then high-fived myself for making such a damn good recipe. So make this green goop and put it on everything! A few notes: pesto is all about throwing flavorful things together in a food processor and assuming it’ll taste good. When I say “bunch of basil,” you might be all, “how big is her bunch” and I’ll be all “none of your business” and you’ll be all “I meant basil you moron” and I’ll be all “oh right um I think it was a handful” and you’ll be all “smh I hate you and your stupid non-recipes” and I’ll be all “I feel you but you can use as much basil as you want man” and you’ll be all “ok thx.” So go with your gut and assume it’ll all turn out delicious.

1/4 c almonds

1 large bunch basil, lightly torn

1 tsp sea salt

Juice of 1 lemon

1/4 c olive oil

In a small food processor, process almonds until they look like a cross between gravel and sand, about 1 minute. Add basil, salt, and lemon juice and process until mixture looks soft and fluffy, about 30 seconds. Drizzle in olive oil and process until mostly smooth, about 45 seconds. Taste and adjust seasoning. Use immediately as a dip, dressing, condiment, or soup (no judgment here!).

Brussels Sprouts Pasta.

This is a recipe from my sister. If you don’t like Brussels sprouts, this will convert you. Take risks! Eat tiny cabbages! To my sister: Thanks for sharing the B-sprout love!

1 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and quartered

3 tbsp olive oil, divided

Garlic salt, to taste (recipe here┬áif you’re feeling extra scratchy)

12 oz pasta

Balsamic vinegar, to taste

Par-cooked bacon, chopped into 1/2″ pieces (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cook pasta according to package directions; drain and toss with 1 tbsp olive oil, cover to keep warm, and set aside. In a large bowl, toss together prepared Brussels sprouts, 2 tbsp olive oil, bacon (if using), and a generous sprinkle of garlic salt. Lightly brush a baking pan with olive oil and spread Brussels sprouts onto pan. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove from oven and agitate pan to turn Brussels sprouts so they evenly brown. Return to oven and bake for 5-10 more minutes or until desired doneness is reached. Remove from oven when Brussels sprouts are tender and lightly browned. Lightly drizzle with balsamic vinegar (~1 tsp or more, to taste). Gently stir to coat. Serve Brussels sprouts over cooked pasta with an extra sprinkle of garlic salt.

Cauliflower Celery Soup.

I don’t have a picture of this because while I was contemplating taking one, I finished it. Next time, swerr! This is 100% kid-approved. My firstborn, who is classically picky, slurped his portion right up before I even had a chance to convince him to try it. Win! Pro tip: put anything into soup you want, puree it, and your kid will probably eat it. It’s like a warm smoothie. The things I’ve gotten my kids to eat because it was unrecognizable…

You’re going to see “season with salt” at every single point of this recipe. It’s probably going to get annoying, but it’s important to enhance the flavor of all the layers of this soup for a few reasons: 1) potatoes and cauliflower are huge salt suckers, 2) you’re not using vegetable stock, which comes already seasoned, and 3) it’s a big damn pot of soup, and big damn pots of anything are gonna need a little salt. When I say “season lightly with salt,” the amount I mean is probably between 1/4-1/2 tsp at a time. If you taste the soup at any point before it’s totally done, it might taste a little watery, but hold off on final seasoning until you’re about to eat it. You’re less likely to biff the batch with an overload of sodium that way. (I speak from [very bad] experience.)

Last but not least, I didn’t add a lot of herbs to this soup because I wanted the flavors of cauliflower and celery shine. Something I do to release the oils (oils = flavors) of the dried herbs is rub them between my fingertips before sprinkling them in the dish. Adding them before adding the water allows the heat to hit them directly, therefore toasting (toasting = flavor) them and giving you more flavor punch.

1 onion, diced
4 cloves garlic, smashed and minced
1 large head cauliflower, chopped into 1/2″ pieces
8 stalks celery (center is best), coarsely chopped
2 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2″ pieces
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp dried rosemary
1/2 tsp dried thyme
1/2 tsp dried oregano
Salt & pepper
Olive oil and parsley to garnish

Put 2 quarts water on to boil. In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, saute onions over medium-high heat 4 minutes in 3 tbsp olive oil. Season lightly with salt. Add garlic and saute 1 minute more, seasoning lightly with salt. Move onions and garlic to edges of pot and drop in potatoes, allowing to lightly scorch on the bottom of the pot. Add bay leaf, rosemary, thyme, oregano, and 1/2 tsp salt and stir frequently for 2 minutes. Dump in cauliflower and celery, season with salt, and cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften a little bit. Pour in hot water and 1 tsp salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Turn off heat and puree soup with an immersion blender (or in batches in a traditional blender). Taste; add 3/4 tsp freshly cracked black pepper and adjust salt if necessary. Reheat if desired; serve hot in bowls garnished with a little olive oil and a sprinkle of parsley.

Vegan Broccoli Spinach Walnut Pesto.

I have a few addictions: 1) coffee, 2) thrift stores, 3) shoes, 4) peanut butter, 5) … 5328945372) hiding vegetables in my kids’ meals. I don’t always need to hide the veggies as both my kids readily eat most things, but hello, addictions don’t usually make sense. What I’ve found is most pesto recipes out there include Parmesan, and that’s not our style. My sister was all, “Just throw stuff in a food processor, and it’s pesto!” Never one to back down from a fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants recipe challenge, I did just that, and it turned out great. Green goddess noodles for the win! I should note a few things: I used frozen broccoli, so it was pretty easy to puree once it was lightly cooked. I also salted the water the broccoli cooked in, so you may need to adjust your salt accordingly.

1 c walnuts
1 lb broccoli, lightly steamed
1 c fresh spinach, packed
3 cloves garlic, smashed
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
~ 1/2 c-3/4 c olive oil

In a large skillet, toast walnuts over medium heat until fragrant. Remove from heat and cool. Pulse toasted walnuts in food processor until they resemble a cross between gravel and sand. Add broccoli and pulse until the mixture is uniformly pasty, stopping to scrape the sides occasionally. Add spinach, garlic, salt, and pepper; puree. With the food processor running, start slowly pouring in olive oil until desired consistency is reached. You may have to pause to taste and scrape every once in a while. Serve with noodles or on pizza! Freeze leftovers.

Meatballs.

These are bona-fide carnivorous balls of meat. No lentils in the vicinity! I like them because they require the tiniest list of ingredients and pass my kids’/husband’s taste tests. I’ve used regular pork sausage but have settled on Italian turkey sausage because the one I buy has no nitrates. I think it’s simply a preference thing. So go bold! Go meatballs!

Meatballs:
1 lb sausage, casings removed (if necessary)
1/2 lb ground beef
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper
1/4 tsp garlic powder
Sauce:
2 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 c dry red wine
1 can tomato paste
2 28-oz cans crushed tomatoes
1 1/2 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp pepper
Salt to taste
2 lbs pasta

Cook the pasta according to package instructions. Set aside. Using your hands, combine sausage, ground beef, salt, crushed red pepper, and garlic powder in a large bowl until just combined. Do not overwork! Shape into 1-1 1/2″ balls. In a large, heavy-bottomed pot (I use my cast iron enamel dutch oven), heat olive oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Place 1/3 of the batch of meatballs in oil and sear the outsides of them, turning so each side gets browned. Do not cook through. Remove meatballs from pot and repeat with remaining batches. Set meatballs aside. Toss onions and 1/4 tsp salt into oil and saute until wilted, about 4 minutes; add garlic and saute 1 minute. Pour in wine and scrape bottom of pot while wine reduces. Stir in tomato paste and toast it, stirring constantly for 2 minutes. Pour in crushed tomatoes, dried oregano, pepper, and 1/2 tsp salt, stirring to combine. Gently place meatballs in sauce and bring to a high simmer; reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 20-25 minutes, gently stirring occasionally, until meatballs are cooked through. Season to taste, if necessary. Serve with pasta.